Brockwell Park Events Q&A

 

This summer there are two events taking place in Brockwell Park, which will cause some disruption to Thurlow Park residents and park users. This is a short Question and Answer as to what is happening regarding the private event Mighty Hoopla and Cross the Tracks which will be taking place on the 8th and 9th of June this year. We will be releasing a further information post about the Lambeth Country show – the only other major event in the park to be held this summer – nearer the time.

What is happening and when? 

The Mighty Hoopla and Cross the Tracks is taking place on 8th and 9th of June. Mighty Hoopla is an 18+ LGBTQ-friendly pop music festival. The festival has taken place previously in Victoria Park in 2017 and in Brockwell Park in 2018 – it will be held on Saturday the 8th of June from midday to 10:30 pm. Cross The Tracks is described by the organisers as a “family-friendly music festival” which will involve “a day of music, food, workshops, talks and more; celebrating the world of soul, funk, Motown, R&B and jazz.” It is new and has not been held before it will be held on Sunday 9th of June from midday till 10 pm.

How much of the park will be taken up

In 2017 after a public consultation we lobbied for festivals to be significantly reduced in size. The festivals that were held in 2018 – Field Day and Mighty Hoopla – were, we felt, far too big for the park. On the back of community consultation we called for events of around 20,000-25,000 people unlike the 37,500 that Field Day applied for in 2018.

We are happy to say that this year the events are considerably smaller in size and far less of the park will be disrupted. There will be 19,999 on Saturday and 15,000 on Sunday. The amount of the park in use has also shrunk in size – here is a diagram illustrating the difference (the orange line represents 2018 and the blue line 2019).

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There will be five stages (three of which are small low capacity stages) which is an improvement on 2018 in terms of reducing the overall impact to the park. We broadly welcome the reduction in size of these events as we have been calling for this since 2017.

How much disruption will there be in set up

In total there will be 18 days of work in the park to set up and take down the festival. Again this is down from last year and although still disruptive we have managed to secure access across the site at all times bar the 7-10th of June which include the festival days and the maximum period of set up and take down. We lobbied for the construction to not take place during half term at all because of the importance of the park to the local residents during that time but were told that some construction would need to happen during this period.

All vehicle inflow will be through the Herne Hill gate. Brockwell Park Gardens gate will not be used for either festival set up traffic or as a point of access or egress during the entire weekend. All of the vehicles will be operating on a time controlled basis so as to avoid park users, be accompanied by a banksman and be controlled at all times. At all times the Herne Hill slip road will be open significantly minimising the amount of disruption to traffic along Norwood Road.

Any damage caused by the vehicles to the park will be compensated by the festival organisers. There should be less work than last year although it is still likely to be disruptive at times.

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Who will be managing things during the festival?

Whilst the event is going on in the park there will be a community help desk and, a dedicated Residents Hotline will be set up for local residents and businesses. The Organiser’s Community Liaison Manager can be contacted at community@mightyhoopla.com and can deal with enquiries relating to both event days (Mighty Hoopla and Cross The Tracks).

The residents Hotline number will be communicated via a residents letter that will be distributed mid-May, and displayed on the Lambeth Events, Mighty Hoopla and Cross The Tracks websites. This number is 0800 043 0305 but please note it is not operational until Thursday 30thMay. If you need to contact the Lambeth Events team during the event days or during the build and break aspects of the festival you can access them on 0207 926 9793 which is the out of hours office number (17:00 – 20:00 build and break & 08:00 – 23:30 event days). Otherwise their normal phone number is 0207 926 6207 – which is available 8:00 – 17:00.

How loud is it going to get?

The noise limits are in line with the noise policy adopted by Lambeth Events and approved by the Council. We have argued along with residents for two years now to have these reduced due to the proximity of park events to residential properties – unlike other large parks in London. However, we were unsuccessful in this although that said last year only a handful of noise complaints came from residents in Thurlow Park Ward, considerably less than for festivals that had taken place in 2016 and 2017.

This year the soundstages have been redesigned to be even more self contained. This should mean even less noise escapes from the festival site. Last year we were made aware of a particular noise cluster around the junction of Turney Road and Croxted Road. We have raised this with the organisers and sound engineers and this has been incorporated into the design of the festival in order to minimise the risk of this happening again.

All reports of anti-social behaviour and noise complaints are independently recorded and will be investigated by the events team. Last year Cllrs independently took noise surveys throughout the day and there are official noise monitoring points at various locations in the park. If there is anything that you would like us to look into regarding the managing of noise please let us know.

What about people coming to and leaving the event?

On the Saturday the park will be clear by 11 and on the Sunday by 10:30. Exit is through the Herne Hill and Brixton Water Lane entrances to the park with people being funnelled towards both stations. Tulse Hill station will not be designated a major transport hub for the festival but we have requested that rubbish points be made available, as they were last year to minimise the impact of egress on the community at large.

The conditions that were in place on the organisers last year are in place this year regarding security and egress. Similar levels of professional security staff to 2018 will be present throughout the weekend and to guide people out of the park. We have also asked for the presence of security to be targeted to deal with the few incidents that happened last year on egress. The organisers of the festival will be coordinating with the police extensively throughout both event days and to get approved in the first place had to go through a rigorous scrutiny process from the fire brigade and police service.

What will happen if there’s damage to the park?

All events big and small, taking place in the park run the risk of damage and this event is no exception. Separate to any money paid to the council and the park for hosting the event the organizer’s have to pay a bond to cover damage and are contractually obliged to cover any and all damage. In 2018 for example a lorry damaged the Herne Hill entrance gate leading into the park and this was repaired in full. No expense is borne by the Council for any of this work and an independent company carries out the work.

How does it benefit the park ?

The revenue from commercial events comes in two forms. Firstly Park Infrastructure Levy (PIL) which is money, that goes directly into the park. Last year Field Day and Mighty Hoopla generated over £36,000 for this budget, which is used to develop the park and provide vital upgrades to the physical space in the park. Secondly there is income from hosting the event which now, following a judgment in the High Court about all London Boroughs which manage their open spaces, goes straight to funding the parks service. Last year this money was in the excess of £250, 000 – we asked for the full figures to be released but were told by the legal team that this is subject to commercial confidentiality in cotracts with the organizers – so absent that we can give the ball park revenue figure. As the event is smaller this year those figures will be lower but we will make it clear how much income is being generated for the event.

Last year Field Day ran a community fund that raised several thousand pounds for local causes. Most of this was paid out but a few thousand pounds was outstanding as of a few weeks ago. We were very disappointed about this and have been in touch with the organisers and the parent company for the event. As we understand this, the funds will be paid out and this was due to administrative errors beyond certain individual’s control. We have made it clear that this cannot be a feature of the festivals in 2019. 

Why do events happen in the park?

It costs £400, 000 a year just to keep Brockwell Park open the grass cut, the trees pruned and the bins emptied. Due to ongoing austerity the parks budget has shrunk by over £2 million in the last decade. Festivals therefore are a necessary way of providing income and investment to the park. We have made it clear since 2018 that Festivals are not a sustainable funding solution for the park. We also as your Cllrs have sought to change the way that events are managed in the park. To this end we have done the following three things

  1. Worked to help the redevelopment of Brockwell Hall as a space for weddings and events. This is now underway and we will be posting more about that later on in the summer about how to get involved.
  2. Fought for and got revisions to the Events Strategy, which include reducing the number of event days in the park each year and put environmental assessments into the process of event approval. These will be published shortly. This should mean that music events in the park are subject to further limitations.
  3. Pursued the development of alternatives, such as looking at the redevelopment of sites that would bring more money into the park making it financially secure and safe from austerity.

 

 

 

Great news on Brockwell Hall!

Brockwell Hall has been a fixture of Brockwell Park since 1813 although in recent decades has remained underused. We are very pleased to announce that a proposal launched in partnership between Lambeth Council and the Brockwell Park Community Partners to renovate the hall has been initially approved by the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF). 

This means that the a programme of work can commence to design both how the hall could be improved and made fully open to the public, as well as looking at how the hall can be used as a venue to host weddings and other events to raise money for the park. The Brockwell Park Partnership Board has reviewed the management structure for this project and it will replicate the management structure for the successful HLF funded projected currently renovating Norwood Cemetery and the programme that repaired the landscape in the park a decade ago. 

The first stage of the work is now up and running and it’s aim is to produce a fully working proposal for the hall along with plans for renovation and rebuilding by the end of 2020. After that stage two of the HLF process will being and if all goes well the hall will reopen refurbished and in it’s new role in 2022. 

As your Councillors in our 2018 manifesto we committed to moving the park away from reliance on large music festivals as a income generation tool. Due to nearly a decade of austerity – in which the parks budget in Lambeth has been forced by successive Tory led governments Westminster to shrink by millions of pounds  – our parks have been struggling for money. Last year a large music festival was held in the park and this year a far smaller version is provisionally set to go ahead. Whilst this will raise money that goes directly into the park this is not sustainable in the long term, even though we have sought to manage music festivals in the park far better than has been done in the past. 

To this end we secured a review of the events policy, which is set to to recommend dropping overly disruptive targets for “event days” in the park as well providing further safeguards on events. We also have been looking at other long term measures to regenerate the park such as the regeneration of the football pitches so they can be used by the community and commercially by five-a-side leagues. 

We have been working closely with Brockwell Park Community Partners on all of these proposals and they have played a major role in realising these projects. The organisations that make the partnership play a vital role in keeping the park open for the 1000s of people from our community that use it every day.  It costs over £8000 a week to keep Brockwell Park running and we are determined to make it immune from the impact of any further budgetary pressure. Community driven projects like these can integrate with the park to provide long term financial stability for Brockwell park.

Park events strategy scrutiny – public meeting

Each summer sees applications from event organisations to hold festivals, sports events or other activities in Brockwell Park. In the last few years, some of these have been of particular concern to the local community because of anxiety about noise, antisocial behaviour or the impact on the park. Many of you have also been in touch about the long term financial sustainability of the park, as it’s an invaluable local asset.

Last year, we worked very hard to mitigate these concerns with regards to Love Box and Field Day applying to come. We held a public meeting and knocked on many of your doors to listen to your concerns. We developed some red lines and put these across strongly to colleagues, officers and licensing committee. Some concessions were won, and we will continue to do this with the application from Mighty Hoopla this summer too.

However, there were some issues raised which couldn’t be dealt with via individual event applications because they were reflections on the wider framework policy for events in parks. We committed to campaigning for a review of the events strategy and to giving you an opportunity to input into this.

With that in mind, we are holding a public meeting on reviewing the events policy and the future of Brockwell Park on 11 March at 6.30-8.30pm at Rosendale Primary School.

Park events – let the licensing team know your views

Mighty Hoopla and Cross the Tracks have applied to come to Brockwell Park for a festival on the 8th and 9th of June 2019. This will be smaller than last year with fewer festival goers – on present information neither event is set to exceed 20, 000 – and with a considerably smaller amount of the park than was taken up by the Field Day festival last year. We have set out all of the details here – including what the implications will be for the park and more details about how we can move towards more sustainable funding models.

Overall this application represents an improvement on the situation from last year, but there are some concerns about how the festivals will be managed and the clear up afterwards. For full details of the application you can see the official form here.

One of the most important aspects of the approval process is the grant of a license to the festival – this allows them to play live music and sell alcohol and is subject to a very tight legal process, run by the Council’s Licensing Committee. Last year when Field Day and Mighty Hoopla were applying a for a license many residents wrote in commenting on the process and, consequently, a large number of restrictions were placed on the festivals’ operations, relating to noise and security. This had the positive effect of significantly reducing any anti-social behaviour and limiting noise complaints to a handful of cases.

Our view is that the conditions on Field Day’s license last year represent the bare minimum for a festival in Brockwell park and we would ask that any license for Mighty Hoopla and Cross the Tracks should at least match these terms, and go further in some key areas. We want restrictions on closing times in line with the updated licensing policy for the area and enhanced noise restrictions.

It would also be really helpful if residents made their views known to the licensing authority. All it takes is an email to licensing@lambeth.gov.uk with the subject line ‘Mighty Hoopla Representation’. 

For all licensing applications please bear in mind that the committee can only take into account applications dealing with the four objectives under the 2003 Licensing Act:

  • The prevention of crime and disorder;
  • Public safety;
  • The prevention of public nuisance;
  • The protection of children from harm.

Any other matter, such as the repair of the ground or bio-diversity cannot be taken into account by the Licensing Committee.

Cllr Fred Cowell making a representation on behalf of local residents on Field Day and Mighty Hoopla at licensing committee in 2018

Further event consultations are taking place this week run by the organisers, and if you have any questions about licensing policy or process, do get in touch with Cllr Fred Cowell on fcowell@lambeth.gov.uk.

Reminder: meeting this week about Mighty Hoopla in Brockwell Park

As we blogged recently, Mighty Hoopla and a new funk, soul and jazz festival called Cross the Tracks have applied to hold events in Brockwell Park this June.

A reminder that they are holding a community drop-in session this week on Wednesday 27th February. They have two times you can visit, during the day and in the evening:

  • Time: Midday-3pm and 5-8pm
  • Location: The Half Moon pub, 10 Half Moon Lane SE24 9HU

There will be an additional community engagement session on Wednesday 13th March 5-8pm at Jubilee Community Hill, Tulse Hill Estate, London SW2 2LY.

If you can’t make either but would like to ask the organisers a questions, they say residents, businesses and community groups are welcome to email them at community@mightyhoopla.com

Field Day Construction and Concerns

The construction of Field Day is now underway in Brockwell Park. As we explained in our earlier post there will be just under two weeks of construction and one week of deconstruction involved in Field Day. In the first week around 70% of all deliveries have been made to the two event sites. Most of what is taking place now is construction.

There have been several complaints, which we have been raised with Field Day about the construction process these have been:

  • the speeding of vehicles in the park- which the site management team raised with the specific contractors who were speeding ensuring that everyone knew of the 5 mph limit. If you see speeding again get the number plate of the vehicle concerned.
  • The public not being aware of which paths are open – this was why signage has been put up about which paths are open.
  • Branches being caught and damaged – Trucks with heavy loads are now taking different routes through the park.
  • The Norwood-Dulwich Road slip road being closed at peak times – this has now been raised with the traffic management team and the slip road is open outside delivery times to ease traffic congestion.

There have been two health and safety inspections and next week the Councillors, the Council’s events team and Park groups will make further inspections to ensure that the trees, greenery and park furniture are unaffected.

We are also working with Field Day on other aspects of the build. All vehicles being used on site (for non-delivery purposes) are fitted with special grass tires so that they don’t make any marks on the grass, vehicles in the park are accompanied by banksmen at all times with extra staff committed where appropriate.

Areas such as the hard standing area, used by martial arts and other exercise activities, have been left open and should be left open until the start of t festival. Also in line with the requests from groups involved with the BCPC and other groups interested in the park large parts of the final area were left open for as long as possible during the build process.

Next weekend is the festival day and the entire part of the park allocated for the festival will be closed.

All of the above is only possible because concerns have been relayed directly to councillors.

In the next stage of the build we need any comments and concerns to come to us so we can do what we can to rectify them. You can contact Cllr Cowell if you are from Thurlow Park Ward – fcowell@lambeth.gov.uk , abirley@lambeth.gov.uk and PEly@lambeth.gov.uk – and other councillors from Herne Hill and Tulse Hill Ward can be found on the Lambeth site.

This is really important as Field Day is here for a one-year trial process only. After the event there will be a full consultation on the event and whether it is suitable for the park. We are also looking to review the events policy, which governs these events. Therefore every single issue about the the construction process, the event itself, egress and entry, noise and the de-rig is vital to feed into these processes.

Field Day FAQs

This an FAQ sheet on the key details of Field Day. For any further queries please look at the Field Day website.

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Cllr Fred Cowell speaking on behalf of residents at Field Day’s licensing hearing

The policies descried here are the result of careful work between Field Day, Lambeth Events, the

Brockwell Park Community Partners and local councillors. In Thurlow Park we held previous consultation sessions on events this summer, worked to modify the event through the Licensing Process and have committed to reforming the events policy.

 

There will also be a consultation period after the event to review how it went. This is intended simply to be a factual overview of what is happening in the park in the next few weeks.

This is not by any means complete or definitive but deals with the most commonly asked questions. We are also hosting an advice drop-in tomorrow Saturday 19th May between 10.30-12.30 at Norwood Lodge in the Park.

What is happening

Field Day is a three day music festival on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd of June. It is the only commercial music event in the park this year. On the Friday it will have around 19, 000 people attending, Saturday 26, 000 and Sunday 15, 000.  In terms of numbers taken up this will be around the same size as the Lambeth Country show – although there are important differences between both events this is useful as a comparator of scale.

How will the event be set up

The event will be built in the park from Monday the 20th of May onwards. Most of the park will be unaffected during this period as the contractors will build the soundstages first. During this initial period delivery lorries will be turning into the park principally using the Herne Hill entrance. These will be Monday – Friday and limited to a window after 10 and before 3 so as to miss the school traffic and come at times where there is limited pedestrian traffic in the park. Any lories will be accompanied by a qualified banksmen – staff who is there to ensure pedestrian safety in the park and on the turn off from Norwood Road. A Traffic Order allows for the temporary closure of the slip-way between Norwood and Dulwich Road – that will be time limited to the specific times when deliveries are being made during the 10-3 delivery window, so it will not affect rush hour.

Will I still have access to the park

Until the 29th of May apart from three designated areas the majority of the park – over 90% of the park will be freely available. After the 29th of May – the Wednesday before the event a much larger section of the park will be closed. From the 31st of May to the 4th of June 31% of the park will be taken up with the festival. This will be removed on the 5th of June and by the weekend after the event the park will fully cleared.

Will there be road closures during the event

There will be a few roads that will be limited to resident access only during the event days and letters from Lambeth Council will inform residents in these roads about this and the procedure being used.  Most of the area will be unaffected there will be some special arrangements made during the exit times of the festival (see below). There will be no bus diversions and apart from a very short window of time at the end of the evening the roads will not be affected. There will be parking enforcement staff on call the whole day on the event days so that if there is illegal parking as a result of the festival it can be dealt with quickly. Based on previous festi

How will people get to the event

The vast majority of access to this event will be by public transport – this is based on the previous experience of the organisers and a mapping exercise of the location of people buying tickets. Herne Hill and Brixton Station will be the principle point of access and according to Transport for London planners – who have been consulted on this – both are able to handle the extra capacity for the event. There will be special designated routes, patrolled by festival security, with partial fences to assist access from Brixton station and Herne Hill station into the park. Security teams will then check everyone going into the event. There is a carefully designed flow system to stop large queues building up, a holding area with toilets at busy times and security teams patrolling the area. This is in part as a response to poorly managed events in the park previously and these plans were carefully designed in consultation with local councillors, park community groups and the local neighbourhood forum.

Will the area be secure while the festival is on

An independent security company Showsec is providing security both inside and outside the event. Due to conditions imposed by councillors and Lambeth’s Licensing Committee there will be more security at this event than at any event in the park before. This will include regular patrols around the park to check for drugs, extra CCTV cameras in the area – some of which will be streamed directly to the Metropolitan Police, stewards on streets across all of the entrance and exit routes (Norwood Road, Brixton Water Lane, Dulwich Road). Over 50 toilets are located on or around the routes people will be taking to enter an exit the festival. There is an extensive drug and alcohol search policy for all festivalgoers, with an enhanced security plan, which has been approved by the police.

When does it close 
Music stops at 10:30 on a Friday and Saturday and 9:30 on Sunday and the park has to be vacated from these times. This is later than what the community would have wanted but the Council’s Licensing Committee had to act in accordance with the law and stated policy.

How will people leave the event

Through the two main exit’s – Brixton Water Lane and Herne Hill these routes will be segregated from the main traffic route. These will be stewarded at all key points and toilets and rubbish stations will be on route.  This should confine people to these two main routes although it is anticipated that there will be some movement up Norwood Road to Tulse Hill station and provisions have been made accordingly During the egress stage – and at this point only – normal traffic will be restricted at the junction of Dulwich and Norwood Road and on Brixton Water Lane but buses and emergency vehicles will still have full access. The organisers of Field Day project that egress of the entire site should take between 40 minutes and one hour. This is not a fixed time, it is a projection by the organisers but it is hoped that on Friday and Saturday the main group of people will have dispersed by around 11:15-11:30.
Community management during the event 
Unlike previous events there is a whole team looking after the wider community outside the festival gates. There will be a community hub run by Field Day in Railton Road. During the operational hours of the festival on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd you can call 0203 886 0739 about any issue regarding, waste management, noise, anti-social behaviour or indeed any aspect of conduct on festival. All calls to this number will be recorded to allow teams to respond to them in full. Even if you have to leave a voice message this will be responded to.  In relation to the set up of the festival any procedure please contact you local councillors and Kelly@fielddayfestivals.com . This is the fastest way to get a response. A log of all complaints received by Field Day will be forwarded to the events team so that their responses can be monitored. Noise monitoring has been set up at various points around the site set above the ground to monitor noise levels.

Waste management and cleaning of the surrounding area

Field Day are providing large numbers bins along the exit and entry ways and have contracted with Veolia to provide an enhanced street cleaning service on every day the festival is running. This waste will be disposed of independently to all other public waste and the normal park bins and waste disposal will not be used. The festival are going to be using shatterproof plastic glasses and have committed to fully recyclable and biodegradable packaging and cutlery. After the event there will detailed information made available about the levels of recycling undertaken

Park recovery after the event

A detailed inspection is being done of the entire site this weekend before the site is handed over, and an inventory has been done of all trees, saplings, benches and other fixed features of the park at risk from the festival. After the event a full audit will be taken with Brockwell Park Community partners, specialists from the council and local Councillors. Field Day are responsible for restoring the park to its original condition and paying the full cost for doing so. This is completely independent of all income to the park and the council.