Field Day FAQs

This an FAQ sheet on the key details of Field Day. For any further queries please look at the Field Day website.

fred field day licensing 2018
Cllr Fred Cowell speaking on behalf of residents at Field Day’s licensing hearing

The policies descried here are the result of careful work between Field Day, Lambeth Events, the

Brockwell Park Community Partners and local councillors. In Thurlow Park we held previous consultation sessions on events this summer, worked to modify the event through the Licensing Process and have committed to reforming the events policy.

 

There will also be a consultation period after the event to review how it went. This is intended simply to be a factual overview of what is happening in the park in the next few weeks.

This is not by any means complete or definitive but deals with the most commonly asked questions. We are also hosting an advice drop-in tomorrow Saturday 19th May between 10.30-12.30 at Norwood Lodge in the Park.

What is happening

Field Day is a three day music festival on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd of June. It is the only commercial music event in the park this year. On the Friday it will have around 19, 000 people attending, Saturday 26, 000 and Sunday 15, 000.  In terms of numbers taken up this will be around the same size as the Lambeth Country show – although there are important differences between both events this is useful as a comparator of scale.

How will the event be set up

The event will be built in the park from Monday the 20th of May onwards. Most of the park will be unaffected during this period as the contractors will build the soundstages first. During this initial period delivery lorries will be turning into the park principally using the Herne Hill entrance. These will be Monday – Friday and limited to a window after 10 and before 3 so as to miss the school traffic and come at times where there is limited pedestrian traffic in the park. Any lories will be accompanied by a qualified banksmen – staff who is there to ensure pedestrian safety in the park and on the turn off from Norwood Road. A Traffic Order allows for the temporary closure of the slip-way between Norwood and Dulwich Road – that will be time limited to the specific times when deliveries are being made during the 10-3 delivery window, so it will not affect rush hour.

Will I still have access to the park

Until the 29th of May apart from three designated areas the majority of the park – over 90% of the park will be freely available. After the 29th of May – the Wednesday before the event a much larger section of the park will be closed. From the 31st of May to the 4th of June 31% of the park will be taken up with the festival. This will be removed on the 5th of June and by the weekend after the event the park will fully cleared.

Will there be road closures during the event

There will be a few roads that will be limited to resident access only during the event days and letters from Lambeth Council will inform residents in these roads about this and the procedure being used.  Most of the area will be unaffected there will be some special arrangements made during the exit times of the festival (see below). There will be no bus diversions and apart from a very short window of time at the end of the evening the roads will not be affected. There will be parking enforcement staff on call the whole day on the event days so that if there is illegal parking as a result of the festival it can be dealt with quickly. Based on previous festi

How will people get to the event

The vast majority of access to this event will be by public transport – this is based on the previous experience of the organisers and a mapping exercise of the location of people buying tickets. Herne Hill and Brixton Station will be the principle point of access and according to Transport for London planners – who have been consulted on this – both are able to handle the extra capacity for the event. There will be special designated routes, patrolled by festival security, with partial fences to assist access from Brixton station and Herne Hill station into the park. Security teams will then check everyone going into the event. There is a carefully designed flow system to stop large queues building up, a holding area with toilets at busy times and security teams patrolling the area. This is in part as a response to poorly managed events in the park previously and these plans were carefully designed in consultation with local councillors, park community groups and the local neighbourhood forum.

Will the area be secure while the festival is on

An independent security company Showsec is providing security both inside and outside the event. Due to conditions imposed by councillors and Lambeth’s Licensing Committee there will be more security at this event than at any event in the park before. This will include regular patrols around the park to check for drugs, extra CCTV cameras in the area – some of which will be streamed directly to the Metropolitan Police, stewards on streets across all of the entrance and exit routes (Norwood Road, Brixton Water Lane, Dulwich Road). Over 50 toilets are located on or around the routes people will be taking to enter an exit the festival. There is an extensive drug and alcohol search policy for all festivalgoers, with an enhanced security plan, which has been approved by the police.

When does it close 
Music stops at 10:30 on a Friday and Saturday and 9:30 on Sunday and the park has to be vacated from these times. This is later than what the community would have wanted but the Council’s Licensing Committee had to act in accordance with the law and stated policy.

How will people leave the event

Through the two main exit’s – Brixton Water Lane and Herne Hill these routes will be segregated from the main traffic route. These will be stewarded at all key points and toilets and rubbish stations will be on route.  This should confine people to these two main routes although it is anticipated that there will be some movement up Norwood Road to Tulse Hill station and provisions have been made accordingly During the egress stage – and at this point only – normal traffic will be restricted at the junction of Dulwich and Norwood Road and on Brixton Water Lane but buses and emergency vehicles will still have full access. The organisers of Field Day project that egress of the entire site should take between 40 minutes and one hour. This is not a fixed time, it is a projection by the organisers but it is hoped that on Friday and Saturday the main group of people will have dispersed by around 11:15-11:30.
Community management during the event 
Unlike previous events there is a whole team looking after the wider community outside the festival gates. There will be a community hub run by Field Day in Railton Road. During the operational hours of the festival on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd you can call 0203 886 0739 about any issue regarding, waste management, noise, anti-social behaviour or indeed any aspect of conduct on festival. All calls to this number will be recorded to allow teams to respond to them in full. Even if you have to leave a voice message this will be responded to.  In relation to the set up of the festival any procedure please contact you local councillors and Kelly@fielddayfestivals.com . This is the fastest way to get a response. A log of all complaints received by Field Day will be forwarded to the events team so that their responses can be monitored. Noise monitoring has been set up at various points around the site set above the ground to monitor noise levels.

Waste management and cleaning of the surrounding area

Field Day are providing large numbers bins along the exit and entry ways and have contracted with Veolia to provide an enhanced street cleaning service on every day the festival is running. This waste will be disposed of independently to all other public waste and the normal park bins and waste disposal will not be used. The festival are going to be using shatterproof plastic glasses and have committed to fully recyclable and biodegradable packaging and cutlery. After the event there will detailed information made available about the levels of recycling undertaken

Park recovery after the event

A detailed inspection is being done of the entire site this weekend before the site is handed over, and an inventory has been done of all trees, saplings, benches and other fixed features of the park at risk from the festival. After the event a full audit will be taken with Brockwell Park Community partners, specialists from the council and local Councillors. Field Day are responsible for restoring the park to its original condition and paying the full cost for doing so. This is completely independent of all income to the park and the council.

Advice drop-in: Field Day in Brockwell Park

Field Day will be beginning to set up their event in Brockwell Park soon, so we have organised a drop-in advice morning to show you the maps and plans, discuss any concerns, take your comments back to the event organisers, and make sure you know how to get in touch.

Brockwell photo

  • When? Saturday 19 May, drop in anytime between 10.30 and 12.30
  • Where? Norwood Lodge – the building in the corner of Brockwell Park by Norwood Road and Brockwell Park Gardens

RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/769095176811997/

Consultation on Quietway 7 is LIVE and you can discuss with councillors at our public meeting

Quietway 7 is part of a network of proposed quieter, low-traffic routes across London designed to make cycling and walking safer and more pleasant. The proposed Quietway 7 runs from Elephant & Castle to Crystal Palace, with the Lambeth section running through Thurlow Park and Gipsy Hill wards.

We have consistently sought to ensure residents and local businesses have the opportunity to input into the design of the Quietway – pushing officers and TfL to withdraw plans for an experimental road closure and organising events, workshops and online questionnaires over the last two years. Recently, we were concerned that a decision had been made without some key changes residents asked for being implemented, and without any further opportunities for the local community to engage.

We therefore got this decision reversed, and over the summer we organised a number of meetings with groups such as the local businesses and the allotments with officers and designers, as well as a public meeting in each ward and meetings with individual residents who have requested them, and some changes have been made to accommodate concerns raised. Where changes we wanted to be made weren’t able to be accommodated by designers, we escalated to a meeting with the London Cycling and Walking Commissioner to make sure residents’ voices were heard at the highest possible level.

A consultation and detailed feedback from officers has been launched here – lambeth.gov.uk/quietway7 – where you can provide feedback until 5 November 2017. 

We have also organised an event in the afternoon of Saturday 21 October at All Saints Church. This is to ensure residents have further opportunities to discuss the designs with councillors and look at hard copies of the plans.

We anticipate this being a busy event, so ask that you choose a timeslot to enable us to accommodate everyone who wishes to participate. Please stick to your chosen timeslot so that we can make sure we are able to hear everyone’s views. You can sign up here. 

If you can’t make it, please do get in touch and we are happy to visit you at a later date to discuss individually.

Quietways – update from the drop-in surgery this week

Surgery this week for Rosendale and Turney Road residents

This week we organised a surgery for residents on Rosendale
and Turney Roads, who will be directly affected by the Quietway going past
their homes – it was an opportunity for those residents to have a one-to-one
discussion with the scheme designers to work through any potential issues with
access to their homes or driveways once junctions are redesigned or speed bumps
put in. Designers will use residents’ feedback and local knowledge to ensure
the scheme doesn’t inadvertently cause issues for individual residents. Anyone who couldn’t attend, we have offered to visit individually – do let us know if you would like us to come and meet with you.

This surgery follows a number of meetings that we convened over
the summer between designers and stakeholder groups like the Rosendale
Allotments and the businesses on Rosendale Road to revisit designs and make
sure their concerns are taken on board. We have also doorknocked residents and
had individual meetings with anyone who wanted to discuss the plans but has
been unable to attend meetings.

The feedback from these meetings is being used by the
designers to revisit plans and draw up suggested changes to the design which
take on board local residents’ and stakeholders’ input.

Full public consultation in September

These new designs will come to full public consultation –
which will be four weeks of on- and offline opportunities to see plans,
comment, and speak with officers and councillors throughout September. We will
organise public exhibitions in Thurlow Park ward and Gipsy Hill ward, and will
circulate plans by email and on the Lambeth website.

This work to involve the local community follows our “call-in”
to the designs which went to a decision in June – we didn’t feel these designs
accurately incorporated local feedback and asked the cabinet member to withdraw
the decision to enable us to get the designers and residents round the table to
revisit sections where the designs weren’t good enough. We were also concerned that cycling groups didn’t support the designs either. 

We have consistently,
for the last two years, championed the importance of involving local residents –
from the start, we challenged a road closure that hadn’t been consulted on and
got it taken off the table. Over the last two years, we have organised many
public meetings, design workshops, stakeholder meetings with businesses and
other groups of residents, doorknocking, online surveys, public exhibitions and
walkabouts.

Changes we have secured to the design

So far, we have ensured that parking is retained by Turney School, and that the changes to the Turney Road/ Rosendale Road junction meet the
access needs of the allotments. 

We continue to be unhappy about the proposal to
make Rosendale Road a through road at the junction with Parkhall, which would
involve removing the existing roundabout. We believe that this will encourage
traffic to speed up and will cause queues on Parkhall, without delivering the safety benefits that cyclists need – this is being
re-examined by designers who will come back to us with some new ideas. 

The
designers are also looking at adjusting the location of the proposed zebra crossing
by Scotch Meats so that we retain shopping parking spaces, following our meeting with businesses.

Investment to tackle speeding we are pleased about

However, the scheme isn’t all bad. We have shifted the focus
of the officers from just a cycling route to a scheme which delivers wider improvements for
everyone, with a much greater focus on walking, reducing speeding and air
quality than was possible when Boris was Mayor. 

The investment in Rosendale
Road is a unique opportunity to make sure we do get some changes made that
residents have asked us for – new zebra crossings, putting in a lot more cycling parking, getting rid of the useless “cushion”
speed humps we have now which encourage cars to swerve and speed and replacing
them with gentler humps which go across the full width of the road, more
planting and trees put in, and raised informal crossings on the side roads so
that cars must slow down instead of swerving round corners. 

As cyclists and pedestrians ourselves, we think that reducing average speed and preventing excessive speeding will have the greatest positive impact on Rosendale Road in terms of it being and feeling safer to travel along. We’re pleased that we will be able to invest in cycle parking and greening, and to work with businesses to improve the area outside their shops further. 

And while we’re happy to see these improvements on the table, we will continue to champion residents’ and businesses’ concerns about all the other
issues raised such as shopping parking and the Parkhall roundabout. We are also
keen to work with residents who live on the side roads, who experience high
levels of ratrunning traffic, to secure additional investment to help them to
reduce speeding on their roads too.